Tag: acquittal

what does acquittal mean in law

what does acquittal mean in law插图

Best answer


The legal and formal certification of the innocence of a person who has been charged with a crime. Acquittals in fact take place when a jury finds a verdict of not guilty. Acquittals in law take place by operation of law such as when a person has been charged as an Accessory to the crime of Robbery and the principal has been acquitted.

People also ask


  • What is an acquittal?

  • Acquittal in Scottish Law A verdict of a jury or a decision of a judge that an accused is not guilty or a case is not proven.

  • What does it mean to be acquitted?

  • The legal and formal certification of the innocence of a person who has been charged with a crime. Acquittals in fact take place when a jury finds a verdict of not guilty. Acquittals in law take place by operation of law such as when a person has been charged as an Accessory to the crime of Robbery and the principal has been acquitted.

  • What is the difference between acquittal and not guilty?

  • Acquittal and not guilty are two terms that are often used interchangeably in legal settings. A verdict of 鈥渘ot guilty鈥?is an acquittal. 鈥淣ot guilty鈥?means that the court does not have enough evidence to believe that you are guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

  • When does an acquittal take place in criminal law?

  • The former takes place when the jury upon trial finds a verdict of not guilty; the latter when a man is charged merely as an accessary, and the principal has been acquitted. 2 Inst. 384. An acquittal is a bar to any future prosecution for the offence alleged in the first indictment.