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Tag: what is lucys law

what is lucy’s law

what is lucy’s law插图

Lucy’s Law isa regulation which limits the sale of puppies and kittens as pets in England. It is named after a spaniel called Lucy who was used for breeding on a puppy farm in South Wales from where she was taken in 2013 by an animal rescue organisation. Lucy had many ailments but was adopted by Lisa Garner who campaigned with vet Marc Abraham to prevent further maltreatment of such dogs.Citation:S.I. 2019/2093Commencement:6 April 2020Made:8th July 2019Made under:Animal Welfare Act 2006

What is Lucy’s law and when does it come into effect?

Lucy’s Law was approved by Parliament on 13 th May 2019 and came in to effect in England on 6th April 2020. The law makes it illegal to sell puppies and kittens under 6 months old unless the seller: has bred the puppy or kitten themselves, or isn’t a business (e.g. if they’re a legitimate rescue centre

What is Lucy’s law and what does it mean for pet lovers?

Animal lovers can start to rejoice now, though, as the aptly named Lucy’s Law came into effect in April 2020, and offers major crackdowns on puppy farms and puppy smuggling in the UK. If you haven’t heard of Lucy’s Law before, then you can find out what Lucy’s Law is and how it impacts the sale of kittens and puppies in the UK. What is Lucy’s Law?

What is Lucy the dog’s legacy?

Lucy was an incredibly brave dog, and it’s right that her memory is honoured with such an important piece of legislation to help end puppy farm cruelty; protecting breeding dogs just like her, as well as cats, their young, and also unsuspecting animal-lovers from the dangers of irresponsible breeding and cruel puppy and kitten dealers.

Who is Lucy the King Charles Spaniel?

The law is named after Lucy, a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel who was rescued from a puppy farm where she was subjected to terrible conditions.

How does Lucy’s Law affect pet buyers?

If you’re looking to introduce a new puppy or kitten aged under 6 months in to your home, legally you will only be able to buy the animal directly from the breeder or a genuine rescue. When purchasing a new puppy or kitten from a breeder, be sure to ask the following questions:

What is Lucy’s campaign?

After she was rescued, a campaign was run in Lucy’s name, focusing on the welfare of puppies and kittens when sold by third parties; dogs like Lucy are often forced to breed multiple times a year, with puppies and kittens being taken from their mothers at just a few weeks old and sold on to pet dealers and pet shops.

Why is it important to have litters?

It’s important that litters encounter adults, children, older dogs and cats and other animals, as well as experiences such as travelling by car, hearing loud noises and getting examined by the vet. This will help to build their confidence, enabling them to cope with new experiences in later life.

When selling a litter of puppies, must the mother be shown alongside the puppies?

When selling a litter of puppies, the mother must also be shown alongside the puppies, and sales must take place where the dogs are kept. This is to try to prevent animals from being separated from their mothers prematurely, before they’ve been socialised.

When did Lucy’s law come into effect?

Lucy’s Law came into effect 6th April 2020, following a petition against poor puppy farming conditions. We look at what this is and how it can affect UK dog and cat owners. Following a petition by animal welfare campaigners, the English Government approved Lucy’s Law in the summer of 2019.

Why is Lucy important?

Lucy was an incredibly brave dog, and it’s right that her memory is honoured with such an important piece of legislation to help end puppy farm cruelty; protecting breeding dogs just like her, as well as cats, their young, and also unsuspecting animal-lovers from the dangers of irresponsible breeding and cruel puppy and kitten dealers.

How can we help protect the nation’s cats and dogs?

But we also need the public to do their bit to help by always asking to see puppies and kittens interacting with their mothers in their place of birth, looking out for the warning signs, and reporting any suspicious activity. By raising awareness of illegal sellers to the local authorities , we can all help to protect the nation’s cats and dogs and give them the best start in life.

What to use when buying a puppy?

If you’re buying a puppy please use The Puppy Contract ; and if you’re buying a kitten please use The Kitten Checklist.

What is Lucy’s law?

Lucy’s Law is the short-hand for the amendment to The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 brought about by The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2019 , which makes unlawful the sales of puppies and kittens

Where are puppy farms located?

Puppy farms are located across the UK with most depending on third-party sellers or ‘dealers’ to distribute often sick, traumatised, unsocialised puppies which have been taken away from their mother at just a few weeks old.

How to tell if a puppy is a red flag?

Research. Have a look at the seller’s profile and search their name online. If they are advertising many litters from different breeds, then this is a red flag.

Is there a fake mum for puppies?

Check there isn’t a ‘fake’ mum – most fake mums don’t interact with the puppies as they fear the real mum returning.

What does it mean?

The legislation means third parties would be banned from selling kittens and puppies.

Will anything else be changing?

The ban, which will apply to England, is also designed to deter smugglers who abuse the Pet Travel Scheme to bring young animals into the UK to be sold for financial gain.

How should you get a puppy?

The RSPCA said anyone looking to get a puppy should consider rescuing instead of buying.

What are people saying about it?

RSPCA chief executive Chris Sherwood said he was “absolutely thrilled” with the legislation but it required enforcement, adding that 2018 was the “busiest year yet” with 4,397 complaints about the puppy trade in England.

Why do people use dogs like Lucy?

Dogs like Lucy are used by unscrupulous puppy farmers to produce litters which are separated from their mothers within weeks and either advertised online or sold to pet shops.

What is Lucy’s law?

Environment Secretary Michael Gove said the legislation, known as Lucy’s Law, was about “giving our animals the best possible start in life”.

When will Lucy’s law come into force?

The new rules, called Lucy’s Law, were laid out in Parliament on Monday and are scheduled to come into force on 6 April 2020.

What is the law on puppies and kittens?

Today’s legislation will ensure that puppies and kittens are born and reared in a safe environment, with their mother, and sold from their place of birth.

What is Lucy’s law?

Known as ‘Lucy’s Law’, it will mean that puppies and kittens can no longer be sold by a third party seller – such as a pet shop or commercial dealer – unless they have bred the animal themselves.

What did Gove say about Lucy?

Environment Secretary Michael Gove said: This is about giving our animals the best possible start in life and making sure that no other animal suffers the same fate as Lucy. It will put an end to the early separation of puppies and kittens from their mothers, as well as the terrible conditions in which some of these animals are bred.

What is the phone number for Defra?

For further enquiries, including images of Minister Rutley’s visit to Mayhew, please contact the Defra group press office on 0330 0416560 or 0345 051 8486 out of hours. Please find a short video for media use which provides advice for people on how to responsibly buy a puppy or kitten.

Why is the law named after Lucy?

The law is named after Lucy, a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel who died in 2016 after being subjected to terrible conditions on a Welsh puppy farm. Dogs like Lucy are often kept by breeders to produce multiple litters of puppies, which are taken from their mothers at just a few weeks’ old and advertised online or sold in pet shops.

Why is Lucy’s law named Lucy’s Law?

Lucy’s Law is named after one of the sweetest, bravest dogs I’ve ever known, and is a fitting tribute to all the victims of the cruel third party puppy trade, both past and present.

Why is Lucy’s law important?

Lucy’s Law will help make all breeders transparent and therefore accountable. This historic change in legislation is the first major step in tackling puppy farm cruelty and illegal puppy smuggling, whilst also providing greater public protection. As the proud owner of five rescue dogs I’m extremely proud to support Lucy’s Law as it will help …

What is Lucy’s Law?

Lucy’s Law is named in honour of a beautiful Cavalier King Charles Spaniel who was rescued from a puppy farm back in 2013. Lucy was rescued from a puppy farm at the age of five, she’d been kept in a tiny cage for most of her short life and used for breeding under the harshest and cruellest of conditions. The treatment she received at the puppy farm resulted in her hips being totally fused, curvature of the spine, epilepsy, and various other conditions. Lucy died back in 2016, but campaigning by her new owner, Lisa Garner, and vet Marc Abraham who also founded PupAid, meant Lucy’s Law was enacted in 2019 and came into force on 6 April 2020.

How long can you be in jail for buying a puppy in England?

Any unlicensed breeders face being sent to prison for up to six months and a large fine.

When did Lucy’s law come into effect?

Animal lovers can start to rejoice now, though, as the aptly named Lucy’s Law came into effect in April 2020, and offers major crackdowns on puppy farms and puppy smuggling in the UK.

Can you buy a puppy in England?

Under this new legislation, from 6 April all dealers and pet shops in England were banned from selling kittens or puppies, effectively wiping out any third party pet sales. This doesn’t mean you can’t buy a pup or kitten anymore, but you can only legally buy them directly from the breeders or from rescue centres now.

What is Lucy’s Law?

Lucy’s Law is named after a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel called Lucy, who was rescued from a Welsh puppy farm in 2013. Her story is a sad one, as she’d spent the previous 5 years in a cage in which she could barely stand up, continuously breeding litters of puppies.

How does this affect breeders?

On 1 st October 2018, prior to Lucy’s Law, the law surrounding licensed breeders, pet dealers and pet shops was updated to prevent them from selling puppies under the age of 8 weeks old. They are also required to state their licence number and the local authority from which they received it when advertising.

How does Lucy’s Law affect pet buyers?

If you’re looking to introduce a new puppy or kitten aged under 6 months in to your home, legally you will only be able to buy the animal directly from the breeder or a genuine rescue. When purchasing a new puppy or kitten from a breeder, be sure to ask the following questions: