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Tag: What is rule of law

a level law english legal system revision

a level law english legal system revision插图

What are the AQA level law topics?

A Level Law AQA – Topics. Contract Law Offer and Acceptance; Intention to Create Legal Relations; Criminal Law Voluntary Manslaughter; Theft and Robbery; Non Fatal Offences; Murder; Involuntary Manslaughter; Actus Reus and Mens Rea; Human Rights Law European Convention on Human Rights; Balancing Conflicting Interests Between Human Rights

What are the basic legal concepts?

The legal enforcement of moral values. The meaning of justice and theories of justice. The extent to which the law (civil and/or criminal) achieves justice. Basic understanding of the constitutional doctrine of the rule of law and its application to law making, the legal system and substantive law:

What is rule of law?

The extent to which the law (civil and/or criminal) achieves justice. Basic understanding of the constitutional doctrine of the rule of law and its application to law making, the legal system and substantive law:

How does European Union law affect the law of England and Wales?

The impact of European Union law on the law of England and Wales. The legal system: the civil courts and other forms of dispute resolution Basic understanding of civil courts, including the track system and the appeal system. Other forms of dispute resolution: outline of the tribunal structure and the role of tribunals.

What are the types of delegated legislation?

Types of delegated legislation: orders in council, statutory instruments, bylaws (from local authorities and public bodies).

What is the independence of the judiciary?

The independence of the judiciary: security of tenure, immunity from suit, independence from the Executive.

What are the different sources of European Union law?

The different sources of European Union law: treaties, regulations and directives.

What is the work of the Law Commission?

The work of the Law Commission: reform, codification, consolidation and repeal.

What is the definition of justice?

The extent to which the law (civil and/or criminal) achieves justice.

What did the nobles of England force the King to sign?

The nobles of England force the King to sign the ‘Magna Carta’ or ‘Great Charter’ . This was a document which took power from the King and gave some of it to the nobles and people. It meant that if the King broke the law he could be held accountable to his people. The most important aspect of the document was the right to due process; that no innocent man may be condemned without fair trial by his peers.

What was the most important thing that the Normans did to Britain?

Britain is conquered by the Normans who bring many new laws and customs to the country. One of the most important is the idea of land and property . They create the ‘Doomsday Book’ a record of who and what is owned by everyone in the country. During this time, although the King and Treasury were in London, the courts of the country and the “Sheriffs” would travel around, staying wherever they thought was suitable at the time. In time the judges were given routes they must follow; even today we often refer to some judges as ‘circuit judges’. The time when a judge would be in town was often known as ‘assize’ and the judge would go through the jails sentencing people. It could be that a suspect would have to wait in prison for months until the next assize to find out if he was guilty or innocent.

What was the Celtic kingdom before the Roman conquest?

Celtic Britain. Before the Roman conquest, Britain was divided into many small nations and tribes. The law of these places would be kept by the local rulers or holy men such as druids. Many were superstitious and actions such as trial by combat were used, if the accused won it was seen that the gods were showing him innocent by his victory.

What happened in 1533?

1533. Henry VIII forms the Church of England, dissolving the Catholic church and severing the country’s ties with The Pope. This gives the King huge amounts of power and control in a country which had always seen the King as below the Pope and a church which carries equal weight with the state.

What is the Legal Aid and Advice Act?

Legal Aid and Advice Act makes funding available for individuals to pursue claims in court paid for by the state. This is not an automatic right but goes a long way to making justice widely available.

How many countries did the British Empire break apart?

Due to dramatic changes in the world and recent conflicts including two world wars, the British Empire breaks apart. In its time over 100 countries including Canada, Australia, Hong Kong and South Africa were ruled by the UK and continue to use similar legal systems. 52 countries exist even today in the commonwealth, a collection of countries with similar institutions and values.

Which monarchy was restored during the English Civil War?

The English Civil War replaces the King and makes Parliament all powerful. Although King Charles II eventually restores the monarchy it is recognised now that it is Parliament and not the crown which runs the country.

What is the LPC course?

This is a one year course, where trainees will learn the basic skills required of solicitors in their day-to-day roles. The skills include negotiation, interviewing clients, advocacy (which means arguing on someone’s behalf), legal research, drafting documents and business skills such as keeping accounts.

What is the final stage of barrister training?

The final stage is the pupillage stage , where the trainee must try to secure a one year work placement, shadowing a qualified barrister. The year is split into two six-month parts. During the ‘first six’, the trainee will perform minor tasks and observe qualified barristers as they perform their roles. During the ‘second six’, the pupil is able to appear in court and conduct their own cases, usually under supervision. This stage is paid, although typically at half the salary of a trainee solicitor completing their training contract.

How long does BPTC last?

The BPTC last one year, during which twelve qualifying sessions, or ‘dinners’ as they are known, as well as pass exams at the end of the course. The final stage is the pupillage stage, where the trainee must try to secure a one year work placement, shadowing a qualified barrister.

What is the training required for a barrister?

Barrister training requires that a trainee obtains a degree in Law.

How long is the solicitors course?

This is a one year course, where trainees will learn the basic skills required of solicitors in their day-to-day roles. The skills include negotiation, interviewing clients, advocacy (which means arguing on someone’s behalf), legal research, drafting documents and business skills such as keeping accounts.

How many months are in barristers year?

The year is split into two six-month parts. During the ‘first six’, the trainee will perform minor tasks and observe qualified barristers as they perform their roles. During the ‘second six’, the pupil is able to appear in court and conduct their own cases, usually under supervision.

What are the two types of legal personnel?

There are two types of legal personnel making up the legal profession in England and Wales. They are solicitors and barristers. Let’s explore how they each train and compare the similarities and differences in their roles. The training of solicitors can be split into three main routes. The first two routes are very similar.